The San Francisco Chronicle has the story of a reserve police deputy who whistleblew and was let go for it.

Homicide rates in Juarez are plummeting as someone finally won the war. Matthew Yglesias points out that when drug cartels are actually cartels, public safety wins.

The government (working on behest of Amazon) and publishers (working with Apple) have apparently reached a settlement. I haven’t been following this very closely, and I’m not sure of all the legalities involved, but I do like the result and think that it will be better all-around. My price point is a pretty firm $10, so this may lead me to purchase more ebooks.

Apparently they’ve finally made a Flying Star Wars Speeder Bike. Also, progress on driverless cars in California!

Montana’s first registered marijuana “caregiver” died in federal prison last month.

Josh Barro describes this election as the Poor vs Old election. It’s interesting how, just twelve years ago, Democrats were competitive with the aged vote. Now the GOP has to figure out how they’re going to replace them. And, of course, hoping they live until November.

Shelby County, Tennessee (home of Memphis) is trying to identify the authors behind anonymous comments on the paper’s website.

First they came for the cigarettes, then the soft drinks, and now baby formula.

To carry on a theme from a previous Linkluster, a woman in Phoenix was ordered not to give out water in 112 degree heat because she lacked the proper permit.

Dana Albert writes about Lance Armstrong and Eminem. There have been a ridiculous number of pro-Lance advertisements on local TV. Either they do it nationally or they consider Arapaho to be a winning market to run the ads. It appears to be working enough that there are letters to the editor in local papers on the matter. To be honest, I care less that Lance Armstrong cheated than that they moved heaven and earth to never actually prove it. I am inclined to give him a pass for the same reason that I give ARod a pass: the methodology in which exposure occurred is more repulsive to me than the underlying crime, in both cases committed by countless others.

Obama’s Race to the Top penalizes smaller school districts. These are the sorts of things that lead beneficiary small-population states to look askance at the federal government. Policies are often geared towards assumptions that don’t apply out here.

A man in Florida stole a doctor’s ID and practiced for a year.


Category: Newsroom

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6 Responses to Linkluster 2^7

  1. Φ says:

    A federal grand jury later indicted Butler and Tanabe on conspiracy charges alleging they worked in cahoots to arrest three men Butler had targeted on behalf of his clients – the ex-wives of the targeted men.

    Butler was allegedly paid by the women to carry out the “dirty DUIs” (drunken-driving arrests) to sully the men with criminal records for pending divorce and custody battles.

    Dude, you buried the lede! But then, so did the SFC. I’m not sure how to react to a story that treats a policeman who merely declined to participate in a criminal conspiracy as the hero/victim, but didn’t e even bother to interview the real victims in this story: the men targeted with bogus DUI and drug charges.

    Have the “clients” even been charged? I saw no mention of it in the story.

    “Not all policemen are criminals,” Howard said.

    No. But they almost invariably protect those among them that are.

  2. trumwill says:

    Dude, you buried the lede! But then, so did the SFC.

    I got the sense that they probably covered the story more in detail as it was happening. This just being a late development. I have no such excuse since this is the first I was made aware of it. I actually found this aspect to be more interesting than a plain-ole dirty cops story. Looking at the actual charges though, I do have to confess it is a rather novel scheme.

    No. But they almost invariably protect those among them that are.

    Well, this guy didn’t!

  3. Scarlet Knight says:

    reserve police deputy

    Two out of those three words show why he was let go so easily. If he was a real cop, it wouldn’t have been so simple.

    The bigger issue that that the whole reason this works is that people feel the right to punish others beyond their official punishment from the court. The whole reason the term “judge, jury, and executioner” came into being is that people LOVE to be all three.

    If someone does something illegal, they should certainly be punished by the legal system. But once they do their time, they should go back to square one as far as society is concerned. If someone commits a crime and employers punish him by not giving him work, to me that makes him MORE likely to commit more crime.

    (I realize I am in the extreme minority when it comes to this issue)

    And, of course, hoping they live until November.

    That’s why the GOP loves when old people vote early; as long as the ballot is in, it counts. The voter doesn’t have to actually be alive on election day.

    baby formula

    The irony is that once upon a time breast feeding is what rubes and hayseeds did, and enlightened parents used formula. Of course now that more and more moms are working moms, they want to make it MORE difficult and use breast milk.

    Of course the SWPL police hate formula. It goes to one of my common themes: society rewards things that are difficult to do. Making sense has nothing to do with it.

  4. trumwill says:

    (I realize I am in the extreme minority when it comes to this issue)

    I’m with you, to an extent. But weren’t you the one saying that the ex-con should be denied a barbering license?

    That’s why the GOP loves when old people vote early; as long as the ballot is in, it counts. The voter doesn’t have to actually be alive on election day.

    Hadn’t thought of that, good point.

    The irony is that once upon a time breast feeding is what rubes and hayseeds did, and enlightened parents used formula. Of course now that more and more moms are working moms, they want to make it MORE difficult and use breast milk.

    I ran across an old magazine cover while going through my parents attic. It was US News & World Report. The cover suggested an article trying to make the case that breastfeeding was child abuse.

    Harry Stein’s book talks about how even Dr. Spock was, at one point, unwilling to suggest that perhaps day care might not be as good as a stay-at-home-parent because of the backlash. Back then it (like formula, I think) was about female empowerment. Now there are class issues involved.

  5. ScarletKnight says:

    the ex-con should be denied a barbering license

    1) I have never claimed to be consistent.

    2) I’m surprised you remember such things.

    3) In my defense, this particular ex-con was twice convicted of sexual assault. To hand him weapons and give him access to customers’ heads might not be the best idea.

    I ran across

    I was hoping you said “came across” so I could make a Playboy joke…

    Harry Stein’s book

    Are you referring to his 2000 book How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy (and Found Inner Peace? I read it once upon a time and enjoyed it a great deal. It is another example of how SWPLs value superficial diversity and are opposed to diversity of thought.

    The irony of stay at home moms is that the ones who want to continue to work would probably make the best stay at home moms, while the ones who have no interest in working outside the home might be better off putting their kids into daycare.

    Stein is most famous for being a member of the originial Rotisserie League. His team was called the Stein Brenners.

    Did you know his father won two Tony awards for writing the book for Fiddler on the Roof?

  6. trumwill says:

    Fair enough. I don’t mean to pick on you, I just remembered our previous conversation and was surprised to hear your more fleshed out view.

    That is the Stein book to which I refer. It was an enjoyable read. I didn’t know that about his dad.

    You’re right that there is some human capital inefficiency involved in who does what.

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