I was at a tire place this morning. In the waiting room was a woman talking on the phone. She talked about all of the gossip going on around her (maybe the local) LDS church. She was actually quite witty and I cracked a smile at some of the things she said. This got a Look Of Death from her for listening in to her conversation.

Of course, I would rather not have been listening in to her conversation. I would rather have been watching TV on my phone, but I couldn’t hear it because she was talking. So instead I just got caught up on blog-reading. The only alternative was for me to go outside, where it was -5 degrees. It’s because of that I don’t blame her for not going outside to talk, which is what I would have done if I’d needed to have a phone conversation while waiting for winter tires to be put on my car. This, despite the fact that it is a pet peeve when people talk on the phone in places that are difficult to leave. I feel that way when I am driving and a passenger is talking on the cell phone. It not only means I have to listen to half of their conversation, but also that I can’t be listening to something that I would rather be listening to.

So I don’t blame her for talking inside, even in the waiting room. Except that (a) it did not seem to be a necessary conversation, and (b) when you have a conversation in such a place, your expectation of privacy is nill.


Category: Downtown

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10 Responses to Expectations of Privacy

  1. Samson J. says:

    This got a Look Of Death from her for listening in to her conversation.

    YES – this is the absolute sickly-sweet icing on the calorie-laden cake that is the miserably poor social etiquette of gabbing on your cell phone in public.

    Why hasn’t a solution to the problem of public-cell-phone-gabbers evolved yet? Is it because what can you do, really?

  2. Scarlet Knight says:

    I feel that way when I am driving and a passenger is talking on the cell phone.

    That is rude behavior on the part of your passenger.

    when you have a conversation in such a place, your expectation of privacy is nill

    +1

  3. trumwill says:

    Why hasn’t a solution to the problem of public-cell-phone-gabbers evolved yet? Is it because what can you do, really?

    There have been at least some reasons for optimism on this. I read about the enforcement of no-cell cabs on trains and how they are actually enforcing this. I also remember when the FAA was looking into allowing cell phones on flights, the airlines said “don’t bother” because they wouldn’t allow them anyway.

    Beyond that, though, it’s another think we can chalk up to a dearth of manners.

  4. trumwill says:

    That is rude behavior on the part of your passenger.

    It’s inconsiderate in a way that a lot of people don’t consider. They think “Hey, I’m stuck here, I might as well do something with my time” without thinking of the position that it puts drivers and the other passengers in. Most of the time, when I mention this to people, a little light seems to go off and they agree. On the other hand, sometimes people skirt the line between a necessary conversation (“I need to tell people that we’re coming”) and unnecessary ones (“My girlfriend will be mad if I don’t call her and ask about her day.”)

  5. David Alexander says:

    while waiting for winter tires to be put on my car

    Next time, buy four wheels, and have the winter tires mounted so that way, you can change them yourself at home with a jack. 🙂

  6. Kirk says:

    What’s a winter tire? (hee, hee) Seriously though, I thought those things were extinct.

    Anyway, I used to try to give privacy to those on cell phones, but stopped. The world is not a phone booth, and those talking on phones in public need to be reminded of this.

    Bonus pet peeve: people who use cell phones as a license to be late. I’ve known people who are late 50%-75% of the time, yet they call as if it makes a difference. Excuse me, your little message doesn’t change the fact that we’re waiting on you.

  7. trumwill says:

    Next time, buy four wheels, and have the winter tires mounted so that way, you can change them yourself at home with a jack.

    I can’t recall how much of the expense is the tire and how much is labor. I am pretty sure it’s mostly the former.

  8. trumwill says:

    What’s a winter tire? (hee, hee) Seriously though, I thought those things were extinct.

    They have “all-weather” tires now, negating the need for winter tires for a lot of people. But I want the studded kind, which are necessarily winter because they’re illegal the rest of the year.

    Bonus pet peeve: people who use cell phones as a license to be late. I’ve known people who are late 50%-75% of the time, yet they call as if it makes a difference.

    Were these people not late before they got the phones?

  9. Samson J. says:

    Seriously though, I thought those things were extinct.

    roffle

    They have “all-weather” tires now, negating the need for winter tires for a lot of people.

    But as you seem to already realize, all-weather tires are NOT real winter tires and are NOT acceptable anywhere there is actual real snowfall!

  10. trumwill says:

    But as you seem to already realize, all-weather tires are NOT real winter tires and are NOT acceptable anywhere there is actual real snowfall!

    Not sure, actually. The dealership was very confident in the AWT that came with it, but I am erring on the side of caution. I am debating whether to get a tire spider.

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