New York Times editor went to war against pirates. It turns out, their obedience of copyright law is in question.

Mapping the body with 2,000 years of images.

The Washington Post has a good piece about the primary care physician shortage. Unlike many articles on the subject, this one hits it where it counts: residency shortages. In related news, my wife is likely leaving primary care.

Megan McArdle and others envision post-campus America. I am skeptical that this will really take hold (McArdle has her skepticisms, too), but the what-ifs are interesting and I think on-target. This may get a post of its own.

Predictions about the death of American hegemony may have been greatly exaggerated.

New York has a funny definition for moderate and middle-income housing. People who earn up to 165% of the median income are eligible. It all reminds me of the fundamental question of NYC: What if they built a great city and nobody could afford to actually live there. An economist would say that’s bunk, of course. But it brings up some interesting questions. Subsidized housing in a tight market can just jack prices up even higher.

Matthew Yglesias asks if reduced federal office demand could be good for DC. Is say so! Move the capital to Nebraska! On, absent that, there’s no reason not to move some of the administrative stuff out. I just sent my taxes to Fresno.

Free etextbooks! This could actually make things interesting…

Bakadesuyo: Smoking is a social habit. Loneliness kills.

Nagging is a marriage-killer.


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7 Responses to Linkluster Century

  1. ScarletKnight says:

    Move the capital to Nebraska

    Your link has nothing to do with moving the capital. Since you brought it up though, I wouldn’t move the capital THAT far. I wouldn’t be opposed to moving it to the middle of Indiana though. After all, Washington isn’t mentioned anywhere in the Constitution; I would imagine that changing the capital could be done by just passing a law.

    Nagging is a marriage-killer.

    And a wife killer, too 🙂

    Joking aside, I tend to side with the wives on this one. If the husband would just do what his wife wants, she wouldn’t have to nag. Or, he should just say no from the get go. Being passive-aggressive should get the wife upset.

    Also, I thought criticizing naggers was against the rules of HitCoffee. 😉

  2. trumwill says:

    Your link has nothing to do with moving the capital.

    It should direct you to my proposal for moving the capital to Nebraska, and the conversation that follows.

    If we’re going to move the capital, I absolutely believe we should move it to the center of the country. The current capital may be close to a lot of people, but it’s way further away from a lot of people, too. The population center is Missouri, but Nebraska is the geographic center, so I would go with that. James Hanley recommended Kansas City, though I like the idea of building a city from scratch.

    If the husband would just do what his wife wants, she wouldn’t have to nag. Or, he should just say no from the get go. Being passive-aggressive should get the wife upset.

    I agree that passive-aggressive is not the way to go, but I don’t think nagging generally rectifies the situation. Clancy and I have a fair arrangement. Since I am forgetful about things, I won’t take it as nagging when she reminds me of the things I so commonly forget. In return, she should operate under the assumption that I am forgetting and not foot-dragging (or being passive-aggressive).

    Also, I thought criticizing naggers was against the rules of HitCoffee.

    Criticizing nagging and condemning naggers are two different things.

  3. ScarletKnight says:

    It should direct you to my proposal for moving the capital to Nebraska, and the conversation that follows.

    My browser didn’t recognize the hashtag at first. Sorry about that.

    I think the new capital should be a brand new city as well, which is why I didn’t specifically mention Indianapolis, which is the location of NCAA headquarters.

    Indiana (most of it anyway) has the advantage of using real time, not one of those bastard time zones that the rest of you people use.

  4. trumwill says:

    I’d be happy to tell any state that would receive our new capital that it must alter time zones. I’m all about doing away with daylight savings, though I don’t think I even understand exactly what Indiana does. I’m actually coming around on the idea that we should do away with timezones altogether and go with Greenwich.

  5. ? says:

    Didn’t your wife train in family practice? If so, does leaving primary care mean that she is going to do another residency?

    My specialty is not well-positioned for the future (not that any of medicine really is), and I sometimes sit awake at night dreading the possibility that I may be forced to do a second residency sometime in my late 40’s or 50’s. Truly depressing to contemplate.

  6. David Alexander says:

    What if they built a great city and nobody could afford to actually live there.

    And yet, the landlords can find people willing to pay top dollar to occupy said real estate. Mind you, there’s a sizable chunk of the low to moderate income population that’s sitting in public housing* or rent-stabilized and rent-controlled units. Plus, even outside of the core, real estate is rather expensive, and some would argue that it’s due to the low number of units being built to meet demand, while others argue that the landlords are just greedy, and others argue that the difficulty in removing tenants increases the opportunity costs (and rent prices) to landlords. Even suburban housing is expensive…

    OTOH, if one watches House Hunters & House Hunters International, rent costs in London and Paris make New York look cheap, while Vienna and Berlin are inexpensive by New York standards. In turn, while Dallas and Atlanta are cheap, homes in the urban Pacific Northwest are expensive, and California’s real estate market are still wacky.

  7. ScarletKnight says:

    I don’t think I even understand exactly what Indiana does.

    Indiana simplified things a few years ago. The entire state now recognizes DST. 82% of the state is on New York time, 18% of the state is on Chicago time. The Chicago timers are in the NW corner of the state (Chicago suburbs) and the SW corner of the state (Evansville and its suburbs).

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