Turkey is going to compensate victims of religious persecution.

The Pac-12 retroactively changed the score of the USC-Utah game after reviewing the game-ending penalty. I do not approve. Neither do the bookies, I would wager, since the points put USC covering the spread.

Linux is mastering Wall Street. I still don’t use it, but nonetheless, this is cool.

It’s important to note that in a recession that decimated male employment where women were hit the hardest. Otherwise, we might get the idea that sometimes men get the short end of the stick. More seriously, I don’t find it surprising that women were disproportionately laid off from the financial sector. For whatever reasons (and I can think of some involving sexism and some not involving sexism), they are more likely to hold the ancillary positions. It’s commonly said that HR and marketing are the first jobs to go.

Acts of God and Insurance. One of the novel ideas floating around my head (based on something some friends and I have already produced) involves a storyline about insurance adjusters whose job leads them to stumble upon the coming of the Endtimes.

If raising mileage standards is the second-best solution to cutting emissions, it’s a pretty distant second. It completely overlooks distance traveled. It does no good to subsidize high-mileage cars if it allows people to have longer commutes without paying more.

An interesting comparison between medical practice in the US and Canada.

How for-profit colleges can save themselves and higher education. It’s really quite unfortunate that the student loan system resulted in a bunch of for-profit colleges with little or no incentive to bring costs down. That was always the biggest potential contribution that they could make. And a respectful article from The New Republic on Rick Perry’s education vision. There is an exactly 0% chance that anyone on Hit Coffee will actively endorse Rick Perry, but it’s worthwhile to point out when he is right about something that nobody but him is really talking about.

I don’t know what’s cooler, that a 61 year old Vietnam Vet has become the oldest kicker in college football, or that the dude’s name is Alan Moore. I’ll go with the former, even if it is NAIA. Kicker is indeed a unique position.

A look at divorce and China.


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9 Responses to Linkluster Seksti

  1. ? says:

    Megan has written about China that it’s despotic government is able to do infrastructure development quickly in a way that participatory democracies can’t. If the Chinese government determines that (let’s say) the economy would be better off if road X were built, the government builds road X. Whereas in the U.S., existing stakeholders (and especially organized stakeholders) have lots of levers that can slow or stop the process.

    Apparently, the Chinese system also reacts relatively quickly to perceived social needs as well, and again in a way that the American system cannot. On the contrary, the American system seems much more adept at doubling down on failure than in either doing something new and interesting (like, say, school vouchers) or reversing course (like, say, abolishing no-fault divorce).

    As a conservative and a republican, I’m inclined to view most innovation with suspicion and I’m glad that our government is limited in its ability to just up and do stuff to us. And I’d prefer to believe that our failures are not intrinsic to self-government, but I don’t really know.

  2. trumwill says:

    If the Chinese government determines that (let’s say) the economy would be better off if road X were built, the government builds road X.

    Of course, that also leads to decisions like this. Our housing issues pale in comparison.

  3. Mike Hunt says:

    Pac 12

    You alluded to the new celebration rule before. The irony is that if the new rule didn’t exist, then everyone would have known to count the touchdown all along.

    Perry

    Yes, while I won’t be sporting a Perry 2012 bumper sticker any time soon, I like his ideas vis a vis higher education.

  4. web says:

    I think you’re giving Rick Perry too much credit on education. I agree with MAYBE 3 of his 7 so-called policies, and only provisionally with those.

    It looks more like the rest of them were designed specifically to give his supporters ammunition to go after political opponents who happened to be professors, nothing more, after he got done packing the Texas education positions with religious bigots from his inner circle of friends.

  5. Samson says:

    And I’d prefer to believe that our failures are not intrinsic to self-government, but I don’t really know.

    They *are* inevitable consequences of self-government. Join the Dark Side, phi! China is awesome: national socialism par excellence, and the new divorce law is likewise awesome.

    I tried to read the Medpage article, but it seems to be down.

    I’m disappointed by the Linux piece. It seems to be about some indecipherable aspect of finance, but when you said the OS was “mastering Wall Street” I expected an account of the ways that Linux is becoming more user- (and thus market-) friendly.

  6. Samson says:

    The insurance article is interesting, by the way. I hadn’t heard about “reinsurance”, but it makes sense. And the history of Lloyd’s of London is neat to read about, if you like that kind of thing.

  7. trumwill says:

    Mike,

    Yet another reason to hate the ruling. And the rule more generally. Games should not turn on such nonsense, nor point spreads. And they definitely shouldn’t be determined after the fact. Muttermutter.

  8. trumwill says:

    I think you’re giving Rick Perry too much credit on education. I agree with MAYBE 3 of his 7 so-called policies, and only provisionally with those.

    Even if his ideas were limited entirely to “We have to find a way to offer a very inexpensive degree plan,” that makes him something of a trailblazer. Nobody has been talking about that. When they talk about “affordability” they mostly refer to who is picking up the bill and not overall costs.

  9. trumwill says:

    Samson,

    I am still of the mind that China is headed for a pretty big fall. Sorry to see that the MedPage article is down. It was really interesting.

    Regarding Linux, I suspected when I saw the title initially that they were talking about something on the backend. It certainly hasn’t become easier to use. I figured it had more to do with security and less to do with that messaging thing. But for what it does, they don’t need the same things that it would take for you or I to start using it.

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